Low carb diets

low fat

http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1900694 – RCT of low carb (well 40gs, ) vs low fat (well, 30% calories) above. the important bit: people cut down calories in both groups, but didn’t match the diet at 12m compared with 3m

 

“high carb diet and lack obesity and diabetes: The low-carbohydrate diet was more effective for weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor reduction than the low-fat diet. Restricting carbohydrate may be an option for persons seeking to lose weight and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.”

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(87)92797-8

” This finding suggests that a high carbohydrate/cassava intake (84% of a mean daily supply of 1916 calories) combined with a low protein consumption (8% of caloric supply) does not cause diabetes.”

http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(02)00364-7/abstract

“he notion that the incidence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) is low among the Inuit subsisting on a traditional marine diet has attained axiomatic status. The scientific evidence for this is weak and rests on early clinical evidence and uncertain mortality statistics”

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1900510

“Significant weight loss was observed with any low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet. Weight loss differences between individual named diets were small. This supports the practice of recommending any diet that a patient will adhere to in order to lose weight.”

http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1900694

“The low-carbohydrate diet was more effective for weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor reduction than the low-fat diet. Restricting carbohydrate may be an option for persons seeking to lose weight and reduce cardiovascular risk factors”  – biggest difference in first 3m.

Evidence on low carb and cardiovascular risk factors – conflicting/about as good c/w other types weight loss diet.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351995/

“Recent randomized controlled trials document that low-carbohydrate diets not only decrease body weight but also improve cardiovascular risk factors. In light of this evidence from randomized controlled trials, dietary guidelines should be re-visited advocating a healthy low carbohydrate dietary pattern as an alternative dietary strategy for the prevention of obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors.”

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/176/suppl_7/S44.full

” Although the present study did not examine long-term clinical effects on cardiovascular diseases, these findings suggest that low-carbohydrate diets can be recommended to obese persons with metabolic risk factors for the purpose of weight loss. Dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider additional evidence of the benefits of low-carbohydrate diets”

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=409791 – 2006

“Low-carbohydrate, non–energy-restricted diets appear to be at least as effective as low-fat, energy-restricted diets in inducing weight loss for up to 1 year. However, potential favorable changes in triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol values should be weighed against potential unfavorable changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values when low-carbohydrate diets to induce weight loss are considered.”

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/87/2/339.long

“These data suggest that diets lower in carbohydrate and higher in fat and protein do not increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in women. In fact, diets rich in vegetable sources of fat and protein may modestly reduce the risk of diabetes.”

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18700873

“Evidence from this systematic review demonstrates that low-carbohydrate/high-protein diets are more effective at 6 months and are as effective, if not more, as low-fat diets in reducing weight and cardiovascular disease risk up to 1 year. More evidence and longer-term studies are needed to assess the long-term cardiovascular benefits from the weight loss achieved using these diets.”

 

NEJM prospective study of weight and diet

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1014296

JAMA 2014 meta analysis

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1900510

“Significant weight loss was observed with any low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet. Weight loss differences between individual named diets were small. This supports the practice of recommending any diet that a patient will adhere to in order to lose weight”

 

2 Responses to “Low carb diets”

  1. Bridget Watters July 9, 2015 at 8:57 am #

    My husband (age 64) had a recent fasting blood test and has cholestrol of 8.1 and was approaching borderline for diabetes. he’s 5’8, eats loads of fish – salmon etc, eggs, cheese , lentils nuts seeds, occasional red meat ie liver, haggis. being a Scotsman, wholemeal homebaked spelt flour bread, low sugar fruits, ie berries, bramley apples, cod liver oil – yummy and rides a bike mostly for transport, has occasional molasses But Sunday is treat day with homebaked yummy cakes which I think he tends to overdo, no refined sugar products for the rest of the week. I use olive and organic rapeseed oil and he likes coconut oil used sparingly. He has sleep apnoea and uses a mandibular advancement device. His parents and many relatives died of heart attacks and strokes (Scottish working class diet?) Weighs about 11 and a half stone, looses weight on a low carb diet. His walks are more restricted just now due to Mortons neuroma. I feel extremely confused about all the conflicting dietry advice, and have a few books and articles on nutrition and watched the Stanford university utube lectures on the diet studies (very interesting) The dietry advice seems out of date as it recommens pasta etc and carbs although wholemeal. I did wonder if they’d got the wrong blood test results ( he also has enlarged prostrate so thats being checked) I am currently reading The Big Fat Surprise, very interesting. I’d like to keep my husband alive as long as possible so we get full value from his private pension!!!!! (among other things!)

  2. Mandy MacIver August 8, 2015 at 7:13 pm #

    At the end of the day short term weight loss does not appear to equate to prolongued weight loss, longevity or wellbeing in our later years. Check out Dr Michael Greger’s work on nutritionfacts.org. He reads the literature extensively and does not appear to “cherry-pick” data as far as I can tell. He advocates a plant-based whole food diet for health and longevity. I am not an appraiser of evidence but I read extensively on the subject and am betting my own life and health on following a plant-based whole food diet. His presentation “Food as Medicine” posted on 3rd August on his website is worth watching. Cheers.

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