Inside Health

references for tonight.

 

Mike Richards and the ‘3 week cough’ awareness campaign discussion

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2361660/

http://www.bmj.com/content/339/bmj.b3094.full

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2361660/?tool=pubmed

This may also be of interest, which is an article about the (lack of) evidence for the 3 week cough campaign;

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/main-content/-/article_display_list/14033555/wake-up-to-perils-of-awareness, with references

NHS Cough 2012

Department of Health. Lung Cancer Awareness Campaign cluster briefing slide pack. 2012

Athey V, Suckling R, Tod A et al. Early diagnosis of lung cancer: evaluation of a community-based social marketing intervention. Thorax 2012;67:412-7

Hamilton W, Peters T, Round A et al. What are the clinical features of lung cancer before the diagnosis is made? A population-based case-control study. Thorax2005;60:1059-65

Ford A, Forman D, Moayyedi P et al. Cough in the community: a cross sectional survey and the relationship to gastrointestinal symptoms. Thorax 2006;61:975-9

Stapley S, Sharp D and Hamilton W. Negative chest X-rays in primary care patients with lung cancer. Br J Gen Pract 2006;56:570-3

The other piece on Inside Health was about the lovely blog here with Dr Martin Brunet where he tells about the Infection Control Nurse, the Care Quality Commission and his train set. The CQC statement is here , the press release is cut and pasted below, and the train set stays.

9 July 2012

 

Infection control advice to practices

 

Statement from Yong Tan, Infection Control Lead Nurse at NHS Surrey:

 

“It’s really important the NHS has good infection control measures in place because this helps reduce the risk of bugs being passed on from one person to another.

 

“We make regular visits to GP practices and other healthcare sites to check they are meeting the necessary requirements, which includes having the appropriate infection control practices.

 

“Following a recent visit to Biscombe Medical Centre, we recommended some steps the practice could take to further strengthen the measures they already have in place. This included a recommendation to reduce the volume of children’s toys they have in the centre.

 

“It’s great for children to have something to play with as it can help them feel more at ease. However, they do carry risk of infection and therefore need to be cleaned every day.

 

“With this in mind, we suggested the practice may want to have fewer toys so they can keep them clean more easily. As it was only a recommendation, it is of course for the practice to choose whether or not to make any changes.”

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